Video Transcripts

Complete removal video transcript

In this video we’re going to show you the technique of complete removal.

This method is suitable for the removal of small numbers of perennial and annual plants prior to them flowering.  The intention of this method is to remove the growing point of the plant.

Physical removal of annuals and some seedling perennials is an effective way of controlling the plant.

Remember safety is important. Ensure your children and pets are out of the way and that you’ve got the right protective gear on.

You’ll need a hat, safety eyewear, long sleeved shirt, leather gloves, long pants and covered footwear.

We’re going to use a garden fork and a hoe or you can use a mattock, weeding fork or shovel.

Perennial plants should have their major root structures lifted out. And air dry their roots to destroy their viability. Larger annual plants can be controlled by chipping them out at ground level.

When you finish weeding, cleaning up is really important. Bundle up your weeds and put them in a garbage bag and then dump it in the general waste.     Don’t put it in the compost, because sometimes seeds and vegetative material will remain viable. You could just end up spreading it back into your garden again.

This video is only one of several weed control methods available. To see the remaining methods head to Brisbane City Council’s website.

Go back to the complete removal video.

Stem scraping video transcript

In this video we're going to show you the technique of stem scraping or scrape and paint.

This method is suitable for treating small shrubs and vines with thin and relatively soft bark tissue, which are actively growing and not stressed.

It’s always important to have the right safety equipment. You can find this information on the label.

The equipment you will need is a knife or chisel, a measuring container, small paint brush and the appropriate herbicide.

You need to make sure you are wearing your hat, long sleeved shirt, long pants, covered footwear.  And for mixing the herbicide you will need an impervious apron, chemical resistant gloves, a face mask and a face shield.

To find out what herbicide to use, you’ll need to read the off label permit. You will find the link to this permit on Council's online weed ID tool website.

Estimate the amount of  mixture you’ll need. Be conservative. You can always mix more if you need to.

Place the required volume of water into the container and then add the required amount of herbicide. Ensure the herbicide and water are mixed and you’re ready to go.

Stem scraping or scrape and paint is perfect for treating vine species, especially Madeira vine, one of the worst invaders of Brisbane’s bushland areas.

The aim of this technique is to remove a small portion of the bark. This will allow the herbicide to penetrate into the plant’s sapwood travelling to the tubers and effectively destroying the plant.

Using the knife, scrape away 100 millimetres to expose the sap wood. Immediately apply the herbicide to the exposed stem. If you don’t apply the herbicide immediately, you’ll find the plant will seal itself off and the herbicide won’t penetrate into it.

For large shrubs and vines, you'll find you have to you'll have to do several scrapes around the vine to allow sufficient  herbacide into the plant.

Last, but not least, it’s time for the clean up.

You need to dispose of excess herbicide in a pit. Your disposal pit must be 50 metres away from a watercourse, avoid water logged areas and be inaccessible by children or pets. The reason for using a disposal pit is to allow the herbicide to be broken down by the soil’s natural micro-organisms. The size of the hole will depend on the amount of herbicide left over and the rinsings of the equipment  you need to dispose of. Incorporate some of the lime with the soil in the bottom of the hole. Then cover the bottom of the hole with about a centimetre of lime.

Wearing all your protective gear, carefully pour the herbicide into the hole. Any containers or equipment used need to be triple rinsed and the rinsings added to the pit. Cover the hole with at least 150 millimetres of dirt. And then mark the spot. And you’re done.

This video is only one of several weed control methods available. To see the remaining methods head to Brisbane City Council’s website.

Go back to the stem scraping video.

Cut stump method video transcript

In this video we’re going to show you how to do the technique of cut and paint.

This method is a quick and effective way of treating some vines and shrubs, especially in hard to access areas.

Before you start, check the weather forecast and make sure these is no rain  predicted for the day and put the children and the pets safely away. Also make sure the plants that you’re treating are actively growing and they haven’t been stressed by drought.

Before you start make sure you read the label to make sure you have the right safety gear. For this job, you’ll need to make sure you’re wearing your hat, long sleeved shirt, long pants and covered footwear.

Before mixing the herbicide you will need to make sure you have an impervious apron, some chemical resistant gloves, a face mask and a face shield.

The equipment you’ll need for this technique is a machete or cane knife, a saw or a pair of secateurs, a measuring container and a container to put the mixed product in, a small brush and some herbicide.

To find out what herbicide to use, you’ll need to read the off label permit. You can find the link to this permit on Council's online weed ID tool website.

Estimate the amount of  mixture you’ll need. Be conservative. You can always mix more if you need to.

With the required amount of water in your jug, pour the herbicide into the mixture. Ensure the herbicide and water are mixed and you’re ready to go.

The intention of this method is to apply the herbicide to the actively growing plant sapwood. The herbicide will move through the plant into its roots and effectively kill it.

Using the saw, machete, cane knife or secateurs, cut the plant at least 150 millimetres above the ground.

To ensure success of this method, it’s important you immediately apply the herbicide mixture to the base of the stump.

Last, but not least, it’s time for the clean up.

You need to dispose of excess herbicide in a pit. Your disposal pit must be 50 metres away from a watercourse, avoid water logged areas and be inaccessible to children or pets. The reason for using a disposal pit is to allow the herbicide to broken down using the soil’s natural micro-organisms. The size of the hole will depend on the amount of herbicide left over and the rinsings of the equipment that you need to dispose of.  Incorporate some of the lime with the soil in the bottom of the hole. Then cover the bottom of the hole with about a centimetre of lime.

Wearing all your protective gear, carefully pour the herbicide into the hole. Any containers or equipment used need to be triple rinsed and the rinsings added to the pit. Cover the hole with at least 150 millimetres of dirt. And then mark the spot. And you’re done.

This video is only one of several weed control methods available. To see the remaining methods head to Brisbane City Council’s website.

Go back to the cut stump method video.

Stem Injection video transcript

In this video we’re going to show you how to do the stem injection technique.

This method is suitable for treating shrubs and trees with a diameter of greater than 100 millimetres, that are actively growing and not stressed.

It also allows accurate placement of the herbicide with minimal hazard to the environment or the operator.

It’s always important to wear the right safety equipment, you will find this information on the label.

The equipment you will need is a syringe, measuring container, a hammer and chisel and a machete.

The intention of this method is to place the herbicide mixture inside the actively growing tree allowing it to move through the sap and into the plant's roots.

To find out what herbicide you need, you will need to read the off label permit.

Estimate the amount of mixture you'll need. Be conservative. You can always mix more if you need to.

With the required amount of water in your jug, pour the herbicide into the mixture.  Ensure the herbicide and water are mixed and you’re ready to go.

Using the chisel and hammer, cut downward at an angle of 45 degrees through the bark into the soft sapwood below. Because your hands are full with the hammer and chisel, you’ll need a friend to help you out with the next part. Immediately roll the back of the blade downward, opening up a pocket in which to apply the herbicide mixture.

This method can be completed by yourself using a machete and a syringe.

It’s essential that you apply the herbicide immediately as you make the cut into the sapwood. You can see here we’ve penetrated the bark but still haven’t got through to the light sapwood underneath. You can see the difference between the two cuts we’ve made. The second cut is perfect – it’s through the bark and into the sapwood underneath.

The outer sapwood layer is how the tree receives its nutrients. That’s why it’s important to ensure that you do a series of cut all the way around the tree leaving absolutely no opportunity for that sap to flow.

Last, but not least, it’s time for the clean up.

You need to dispose of excess herbicide in a pit. Your disposal pit must be 50 metres away from a watercourse, avoid water logged areas and be inaccessible to children or pets. The reason for using a disposal pit is to allow the herbicide to be broken down by the soil’s natural micro-organisms. The size of the hole will depend on the amount of herbicide left over and the rinsings of the equipment that you need to dispose of.  Incorporate some of the lime with the soil in the bottom of the hole. Then cover the bottom of the hole with about a centimetre of lime.

Wearing all your protective gear, carefully pour the herbicide into the hole. Any containers or equipment used need to be triple rinsed and the rinsings added to the pit. Cover the hole with at least 150 millimetres of dirt. And then mark the spot. And you’re done.

This video is only one of several weed control methods available. To see the remaining methods head to Brisbane City Council’s website.

Go back to the stem injection video.

Basal bark treatment video transcript

Hi, in this video we’re going to show you how to use the basal bark technique.

This method is suitable for treating shrubs and trees that are actively growing and not stressed. (Oh, so stressed. Don’t stress me.)

Before you start make sure you check the weather, make sure there’s no rain forecast or strong winds on the day you’ll be doing the work. Also make sure your kids and pets are safely out of the way.

It’s always important to wear the right safety equipment. You can also find this information on the label.
You need to make sure you are wearing your hat, long sleeved shirt, long pants, covered footwear.

For mixing the herbicide you will need an impervious apron, chemical resistant gloves, face mask and face shield.

To find out what herbicide to use, you will need to read the off label permit. 

For applying the herbicide, the equipment you will need is the herbicide, measuring container, a small paint brush and some chemical resistant gloves.

This method requires the use of an oil soluble herbicide. Read your label to make sure your herbicide is suitable. In this case we will be using kerosene.

Estimate the amount of herbicide you will need, be conservative – it’s always easier to mix more later if you need it.

Read the label to find out the correct rate of herbicide to kerosene.

Measure out the required amount of kerosene. Measure out the required amount of herbicide and add it to the container. Agitate your mixture and you’re ready to go!

Starting at the base of each stem, paint all the way around each stem to a height of 300 millimetres.

To allow herbicide uptake, ensure the treated area is not disturbed for 24 hours. Depending on the species, this technique can take up to two months to get results, but it’s worth it.

If it’s a large tree, falling branches can be a hazard. We don’t recommend this method if falling branches could cause damage.

Last, but not least, it’s time for the clean up.

You need to dispose of excess herbicide in a pit. Your disposal pit must be 50 metres away from a watercourse, avoid water logged areas and be inaccessible to children or pets. The reason for using a disposal pit is to allow the herbicide to broken down using the soil’s natural micro-organisms. The size of the hole will depend on the amount of herbicide left over and the rinsing of the equipment. Incorporate some of the lime with the soil in the bottom of the hole. Then cover the bottom of the hole with about a centimetre of lime.

Wearing all your protective gear, carefully pour the herbicide into the hole. Any containers or equipment used need to be triple rinsed and the rinsings added to the pit. Cover the hole with at least 150 millimetres of dirt. And then mark the spot. And you’re done.

This video is only one of several weed control methods available. To see the remaining methods head to Brisbane City Council’s website.

Go back to the basal bark treatment video.

Foliar spray video transcript

Hello, today we’re going to show you how to do a overall wet spray application. This technique is suitable for treating grasses, herbs, shrubs and trees up to shoulder height. To get the best outcome avoid rainy or windy days and make sure that the plants are actively growing. Just after rain and once all the dew has evaporated, is ideal.

It’s always important to wear the right safety equipment. You can find this information on the label.

Before you start make sure you’ve got everything you are going to need to do the job safely and effectively, starting with your safety equipment. You’ll need a hat, long sleeved shirt, long pants and covered shoes. When you’re mixing up the herbicide, you’re going to need a pair of chemical gloves, an impervious apron and a face shield to protect you.

Then, when you’re spraying, you’ll use a face mask and you can use a lighter pair of chemical gloves so that your hands are protected and they can still breathe. Make sure the kids and pets are safely out of the way.

For this job you’ll need a measuring container for measuring your herbicide and you’ll also need a knapsack or a compression spray unit.

Before you start make sure you follow the manufacturers instructions on how to use your particular equipment properly.

Now you’re kitted out (woman off screen: whoohoo, nice look) it’s time for the fun stuff. Your first step is to fill the knapsack up with the required amount of water.   

To find out what herbicide to use, you’ll need to read the off label permit. You can find the link to this permit on Council's online weed ID tool website. Herbicide is expensive so always be conservative when estimating how much you’ll need for the job. You can always mix more.

Measure out the required amount of herbicide, always read the label and follow instructions carefully, don’t be tempted to add a little more just to be sure. The label’s recommendation is aimed at optimal effect. Add the herbicide to the water. Seal the lid tightly and agitate the sprayer to mix it thoroughly. And now you’re ready to spray.

Spray close to the target plants. Too far away and you may get drift hitting plants you don’t want to kill. Too close and the herbicide will bounce off, potentially killing other plants. Spray to cover all leaves and stems to the point of visible wetness.

Use short sweeping strokes and always start from the far corner of the infestation working away from sprayed areas.

Be systematic to avoid spraying the same area twice. Use a landmark to remember where you were last if you have to refill your sprayer. After about three weeks you should see results like these.

Last, but not least, it’s time for the clean up.

You need to dispose of excess herbicide in a pit. Your disposal pit must be 50 metres away from a watercourse, avoid water logged areas and be inaccessible to children by pets. The reason for using a disposal pit is to allow the herbicide to be broken down by the soil’s natural micro-organisms. The size of the hole will depend on the amount of herbicide left over and the rinsings of the equipment. Incorporate some of the lime with the soil in the bottom of the hole. Then cover the bottom of the hole with about a centimetre of lime.

Wearing all your protective gear, carefully pour the herbicide into the hole. Any containers or equipment used need to be triple rinsed and the rinsings added to the pit. Cover the hole with at least 150 millimetres of dirt. And then mark the spot. And you’re done.

This video is only one of several weed control methods available. To see the remaining methods head to Brisbane City Council’s website.

Go back to the foliar spray video.

Slashing and mowing video transcript

In this video we’re going to show you how to treat large areas of herbs and grasses using slashing and mowing. It works by breaking the flowering and seeding cycle. Over time this is going to reduce overall size of the infestation so you can use another control method.

Don't slash or mow when the plants are wet as seed will stick to you and your equipment only leading to further spread.

You can use a mower, a brushcutter or a whippersnipper for this technique.

Remember personal safety is important. Starting with your face shield, ear protection, long sleeved shirt, gloves, long pants, covered shoes and shin guards.  Read the manufacturer’s instructions for proper use of your equipment.

Read the manufacturer’s instructions for proper operation of your equipment. Slash and mow as low as you can to  retard the plant’s growth. The technique is most effective on grasses and annual weeds. Avoid using it on perennials, like cobblers pegs for example because it could cause them to actually flower sooner and at much lower heights than normal.

To finish off your fine work, clean down your equipment to stop the seed from spreading next time you use your equipment. Always clean down in the same place and avoid storm water drains and waterways. Try to use the same area every time and monitor it so that you can treat anything that comes up. Target those hard to get at areas with a hose or with a brush.

This video is only one of several weed control methods available. To see the remaining methods, head to Brisbane City Council’s website.

Go back to the slashing and mowing video.