Jumping cholla

Cylindropuntia prolifera
Succulent
Whorled
Reduced / Needle
Purple
Green
Grey

Biosecurity Queensland must be notified within 24 hours Ph. 13 25 23
Biosecurity Queensland Must attend site before any control measure is administered, advise will be provided to the land holder at this time

Common names 
Also known as: tree cactus, walkingstick cholla, cane cactus,
Family 
Cactaceae
Deciduous 
No
Flowering time 
Spring–Early Summer
Native/Exotic 
Native
Origin 
California and Mexico
Notifiable 
Yes
State declaration 
Category 2,3,4,5 - Must be reported to Biosecurity inspector or authorised person. Must not be distributed, moved, possessed or kept under your control.
Council declaration 
As per State Declaration
Known distribution 

Small infestation found in Longreach, Queensland.

Habitat 

Prefers semi-arid and arid rangeland in subtropical areas.

Habit 

Erect, tree like

Sharp spines threaten native animals, bushwalkers and farm animals with the spines capable of penetrating boots and tyres.

Stem and leaves 

Stem segments are dull-green to greenish-grey, whorled or subwhorled, cylindrical, 4-15cm long, 4-5cm wide, waxy flaky surface when dry. Prominent tubercles and segments easily detached. Spines are light to dark brown, 7-11 per areole, 1-2cm long, interlacing, white to light-tan sheath firmly attached.

Flowers and fruits 

Flowers are rose to magenta, 25-30mm wide, fruit are obovoid to globose, solitary or forming chains, up to 20-50mm long, green.

Reproduction and dispersal 

This plant reproduces by seed and also vegetatively via its fleshy (i.e. succulent) stem fragments (i.e. the stem segments may become dislodged and produce roots). Stem fragments are spread by becoming attached to animals, footwear and vehicles. They may also be dispersed by floodwaters and in dumped garden waste. The fruit are eaten by various animals (e.g. birds and foxes) and the seeds then spread in their droppings.

Similar species 

Snake cactus