white mulberry

Morus alba
Tree
Alternate
Simple
White
Green

A small (9-15m) deciduous tree.

Common names 
Also known as: white mulberry, common mulberry, mulberry, silkworm mulberry, white mulberry tree,
Family 
Moraceae
Deciduous 
Yes
Flowering time 
Summer
Native/Exotic 
Exotic
Origin 
Native to central and northern China.
Notifiable 
No
Council declaration 
Class R – Reduce populations
Known distribution 

Widely naturalised in eastern Australia (i.e. in the coastal districts of south-eastern and central Queensland and the coastal districts of central New South Wales).

Habitat 

A weed of riparian vegetarion, drainage lines, urban bushland, roadsides, disturbed sites and waste areas.

Impact and control methods 

"White mulberry (Morus alba) is regarded as an environmental weed in New South Wales and Queensland. This introduced species has been widely cultivated in gardens for its fruit, and its leaves are also used to feed silkworms. It has become naturalised mainly in the warmer coastal districts of eastern Australia and is a weed of watercourses (i.e. riparian areas), native bushland, forest margins and roadsides.

White mulberry (Morus alba) is ranked among the top 200 most invasive plants in south-eastern Queensland and appears on several local environmental weed lists (e.g. in Ipswich City, Redlands Shire and Caboolture Shire). It is becoming quite common along waterways in Brisbane and other parts of south-eastern Queensland (e.g. it is a priority weed in the Kedron Brook catchment in Brisbane).

It is also naturalised in conservation areas and along waterways in the Sydney region (e.g. Yarramundi Reserve, Tench Reserve Riparian Corridor and Werrington Creek Riparian Corridor in the Hawkesbury River County Council area) and is of concern in north-eastern New South Wales, where it appears on some local and regional environmental weed lists (e.g. in Lismore Shire, Byron Shire and the environmental weed list for the North Coast region)."