Cotoneaster

Cotoneaster lacteus
Shrub
Alternate
Simple
White
Green

Parney's cotoneaster is a 6-8 ft. tall and 6-12 ft. wide mounding shrub in the rose family. The leaves are dark green above and beige below. Clusters of small white flowers bloom in spring and become bright red berries in fall and winter. It was introduced from China as an ornamental plant and has escaped cultivation

Common names 
Also known as: late cotoneaster, milkflower cotoneaster, Parney's cotoneaster,
Family 
Rosaceae
Deciduous 
No
Flowering time 
spring and summer
Native/Exotic 
Exotic
Origin 
native to the Yunnan Province of China
Notifiable 
No
State declaration 
Nil
Council declaration 
Class R – Reduce populations
Known distribution 

Naturalised in some of the cooler regions of south-eastern and eastern Australia (i.e. in the sub-coastal districts of south-eastern Queensland, on the tablelands of northern New SouthWales, in the ACT, and in south-eastern South Australia). Possibly also naturalised in Tasmania. Naturalised overseas in western USA (i.e. Washington, Oregon and California).

Habitat 

Reported mostly in association with gardens and intentional cultivation, including cemetery and garden surrounds and scrubland. This species is native to the Himalayas of SW China, Tolerant of frosts, drought, maritime exposure and some shading, while susceptible to waterlogging

Habit 

Evergreen shrub, 6-12 ft (1.8-3.7 m), spreading, dense, arching, reddish stems. 

Impact and control methods 

This species is regarded as an environmental weed in New SouthWales and the ACT, and as a potential environmental weed in Tasmania and Victoria.Like other cotoneasters (i.e. Cotoneaster spp.), it forms thickets under trees and displaces local native plantspecies. Milk-flower cotoneaster (Cotoneaster coriaceus) is easily confused with large-leaved cotoneaster (Cotoneaster glaucophyllus), hence its distribution and abundance in Australia may be underestimated. 

Stem and leaves 

Leaves alternate, simple, leathery, fairly large, about 5.5 x 3.5 cm, dark green above and white-tomentose below.  

Flowers and fruits 

Flowers white, off-scented, in 6.5 cm wide clusters in spring.  Dense fruiting, many clusters of red fruit, 4 mm diam., each containing two nutlets, hang below leaves in fall and winter.

Reproduction and dispersal 

Each plant produces thousands of fruits each year, which are distributed flowing water, and human activities. Unusually for this genus, the fruits are avoided by birds hence the fruit persists on the plant throughout the winter