stinking Roger

Tagetes minuta
Shrub
Opposite
Simple
White
Yellow
Green

Annual herb with erect stems, deeply divided yellow-green leaves, and clusters of dull yellow cylindrical flower-heads. The marigold-like smell of the plants is distinctively sharp and unpleasant, hence its common name, stinking roger.

Common names 
Also known as: Stinking Roger, Aztec marigold, chinchilla, dwarf marigold, false marigold, wild marigold, khaki bush , Mexican marigold, tagetes, muster John Henry , stinkweed,
Family 
Asteraceae
Deciduous 
No
Flowering time 
Summer - Autumn
Native/Exotic 
Exotic
Origin 
Native to South America (i.e. Brazil, Bolivia, Ecuador, Argentina, Chile, Paraguay and Uruguay).
Notifiable 
No
Council declaration 
Class R – Reduce populations
Known distribution 

Widely naturalised in eastern Australia (i.e. widespread in Queensland and New South Wales), and scattered in southern Australia (i.e. in some parts of Victoria, in the south-eastern and southern parts of South Australia, and in south-western Western Australia). Also sparingly naturalised in the ACT and naturalised on Norfolk Island. Naturalised overseas in Europe, Africa, Madagascar, Asia, New Zealand, the USA, Canada and Hawaii.

Habitat 

Weed of roadsides, creek banks, disturbed or neglected sites, sometimes a weed of pastures and cultivation. Prefers damp soils.

Habit 

Upright Annual herd to 2 metres tall

Impact and control methods 

Rapidly colonises disturbed areas out-competeing native vegetation.

Stem and leaves 

The leaves are light green, hairless and with leaf stalks (petioles) up to 3 cm long and deeply divided blades up to 15 cm long. The leaf blade is dissected into elliptic-elongated leaflets (1-7 x 0.2-1.1 cm in size) with margins that are toothed. Glands can be found in the clefts between these teeth on the margins. Crushed plants have a very distinctive, unpleasant, and strong marigold-like smell.

Flowers and fruits 

Flower-heads are cylindrical (10 x 2 mm in size), dull yellow, and borne in clusters at the tips of the stems. Flowering occurs from summer to autumn. The seeds are black, 7-8 mm long and narrow, with a ring (pappus) of 4-6 bristles at one end.

Reproduction and dispersal 

This plant is typically disperesed locally by wind and over loge distances by animal and contaminate soil movement.